Blake’s ‘Tyger’ and Prof. Miner’s Bumble-Bee

Posted on by David Gelber

The ‘Tyger’ of my title cannot be unfamiliar to the readers of the Literary Review. Prof. Miner, however, needs a brief introduction. He is Professor Paul Miner, a literary scholar, who is reported to have ‘studied at the Universities of California, Kansas and Wichita . . . and published a number of articles on.Blake in […]

God the Father

Posted on by David Gelber

Dr. Rizzuto’s book is a study of the formation of the God representation and its modification and uses during the entire course of life. She differs from Freud in that she finds this representation is affected by the child’s relationship not only with his real father but also with his mother and other significant early […]

Letter from New York

Posted on by Tom Fleming

Cold winds are blowing across Manhattan now from the East River and the Hudson. New Yorkers are scuttling round the grid of their streets, using the megalithic buildings for baffles. The Museum of Modern Art is celebrating its 50th anniversary with reconstruction and conservation. While the jackhammers demolish the surrounding real estate to prepare the […]

The Plain Man’s Pound

Posted on by Tom Fleming

Michael Alexander offers ‘an introductory critical survey of Pound’s verse as a whole’. After books by Kenner, Davie, Espey, Dekker, Stock and many others, do we still need such a thing? American academics have become divided unevenly into the Pound industry (producing some fascinating work on sources and contexts) and the majority who have put […]

Gasping for Words

Posted on by Tom Fleming

There may be hope for civilisation after all if a dictionary can rise – as this one has done – to the commanding heights of the non-fiction best sellers’ list. The popularity of Collins Dictionary of the English Language is understandable: it is well-presented, crisply-written, frighteningly comprehensive, and, at the price, a real bargain. It […]

Letter from New York

Posted on by Tom Fleming

The crisp clear days of September gave way to haze, rain and eventually snow by mid-October. Will a foreshortened fall presage another severe winter? Did the nuclear ‘accident’ at Three Mile Island in April confirm what everyone will tell you – the weather patterns are changing. At least the snow will deaden the noise and […]

An Innocent at the Fair

Posted on by Tom Fleming

I should, first, declare an interest or two: I attended the 31st Frankfurt Book fair as a journalist for this publication and others, as a writer whose work was being traded there, and as an incipient publisher who intended to wheel and deal with the big boys. It was, also, my first Frankfurt. I had […]

Yeats’s Image of Ireland

Posted on by Tom Fleming

In 1889 the 24-year-old W B Yeats wrote in his introduction to Stories from Carleton: ‘If you would know Ireland – body and soul – you must read its poems and stories.’ He was struck by the sound of two different accents in Anglo-Irish literature: that of the gentry and that of the peasantry and […]

He Wrote With a Pen in Each Hand

Posted on by David Gelber

‘Well!’ wrote the 27-year-old Charles Dodgson at the end of a particularly long letter to one of his cousins, ‘you ought to be very much obliged to me for writing so long a letter (and I hate letter-writing as a general rule)’. Some 1400 letters later, you might be forgiven for questioning the applicability of […]

Theatre and Metatheatre

Posted on by David Gelber

Harold Pinter’s two most recent plays have both been supplied with a part-ironic kind of self-definition by their casting. No Man’s Land is an allusive work, full of references to literature outside itself, integrated with a deftness that makes Stoppard, by contrast, look like The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations; but the strongest reference is the […]

The Youthful Lawrence

Posted on by David Gelber

At last – the Lawrence book we have been waiting for. Since Lawrence’s death in 1930 hundreds of critical studies of his work have been published and innumerable copies of his novels sold, yet there is still no reliable edition of his writings or comprehensive collection of his letters. It is, of course, much harder […]

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