John Dugdale

Joyce Would Be Proud

Only Revolutions

By

Doubleday 360pp £20 order from our bookshop

Mark Danielewski had a promising go at creating unreadable fiction in his debut, House of Leaves. Crudely summarisable as a horror story about a house that keeps alarmingly changing shape, it featured three layered narratives – records in various media kept by the family who lived there, the notebooks of a blind man obsessed with the house and the family’s terrifying experiences, and the ramblings of a tattooist who discovered these notebooks after their author’s death.

Readers were also asked to cope with myriad textual forms and visual materials, a plethora of footnotes, and typographical antics. The key non-horror influences were clearly Laurence Sterne and Lewis Carroll, but filtered through Godardian art cinema and Derrida.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,
    • ‘Look,’ says Trump. ‘The fact is I’m only human.’ On the evidence of this book that point is debatable. From the A… ,
    • From our December/January issue - here's John Banville's review of Colm Tóibín on the fathers of Wilde, Yeats and J… ,
    • Hi , we would love to review 'Death of the Vazir-Mukhtar' in our next issue! Please could you get in… ,