Andrew Lownie

Access Denied

Documents are the lifeblood of historians: they provide the bricks to build our understanding of the past. Making government records publicly available is an essential part of any democracy. However, the means by which researchers gain access to many documents, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), is being systematically undermined. The government claims that it is costly to administer and limits the work of ministerial departments. The Freedom of Information Commission, appointed last year by the government to review the FOIA’s workings,  recently rejected a proposal to charge for requests. Nevertheless, the implementation of the act leaves a lot to be desired.

Subscribe to read the full article

Chicago_Oct2016

kentstate_oct_2016_online

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Gideon Rachman charts the migration of power from West to East. How, asks Michael Burleigh, will the USA respond? ,
    • ‘Not everyone knows what it is to have your father’s rival’s penis inches from your nose’. Ian McEwan in a Nutshell ,
    • RT : I've got approx. 100 copies of from early 1990s-2000s to give away (most w/ covers).… ,
    • 'I Contain Multitudes is popular science writing at its best.' Wendy Moore is fascinated by a study on microbes ,
    • 'Costume of the life force? Words fail.' Germaine Greer on an ode to the condom ,
    • It's Write on Kew for the next four days. There are free copies of Literary Review about; why not dip your toe into the magazine?,
    • Which sci-fi author time-travelled to ancient Rome and lived a parallel life a persecuted Christian named Thomas? ,