Shahidha Bari

Best Dressed

Clothing Art: The Visual Culture of Fashion, 1600–1914

By

Yale University Press 572pp £55 order from our bookshop

A strikingly handsome fellow appears early on in Aileen Ribeiro’s weighty new book, Clothing Art. Quite how handsome you can judge for yourself at the National Gallery, where the Italian artist Giovanni Battista Moroni’s painting Il Tagliapanni (‘The Tailor’) quietly hangs. He is neatly bearded in the rakish Renaissance way, dressed in a patterned doublet of pinkish cream, a high-necked ruff and puffed (or bombasted) hose the colour of rust. He stands at a worktable, a pair of tailor’s shears grasped in one hand, a mass of dark fabric gathered in the other. Moroni positions his head bent to his task but with his face tilted to meet our gaze evenly. Tailoring, Ribeiro observes, was ‘serious work’ in the 1570s because cloth could be costly. When Moroni’s tailor soberly stares out at us, he means business.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Whom did Picasso label a 'bristly pig'? Read Rosalind P Blakesley's review of The Collector by Natalya Semenova to… ,
    • Alexandra Gajda on Anna Beer's new biography, Patriot or Traitor: The Life and Death of Sir Walter Ralegh ,
    • Mark Lawson reviews @jonathancoe's Middle England - The Rotters' Club for our Brexit age. ,
    • 'Behind every book that is published lies ... a haunted landscape, populated by the ghosts of things written and ex… ,
    • 'We once more live in a great age of dragon invention' Here's Tom Shippey on Martin Arnold's The Dragon ,
    • RT : Man at the q&a part of the book panel: Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't s… ,
    • Here's @epkaufm's Whiteshift, reviewed in this month's magazine by ,