Tom Mustill

Big Game Photographer

The Shark and the Albatross: Travels with a Camera to the Ends of the Earth

By

Profile 240pp £17.99 order from our bookshop

Instead of observing wild animals for themselves, many humans today see them via the recordings of a small group of professionals whose job it is to capture them on film. Over the last fifty years, the equipment has become quieter and more mobile and the techniques have been honed to the point where we can watch, for example, orcas catch and devour a humpback whale calf in a remote sea through rock-steady, ultra-high-definition recordings captured from above, on and below the water’s surface.

No films of this sort are more celebrated than those produced by the Bristol-based BBC Natural History Unit. John Aitchison is one of this band. The images he’s recorded have helped shape how we imagine the wild. His magical book chronicles some of the missions he’s been on and documents some of the moral and personal conflicts involved.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,
    • ‘Look,’ says Trump. ‘The fact is I’m only human.’ On the evidence of this book that point is debatable. From the A… ,
    • From our December/January issue - here's John Banville's review of Colm Tóibín on the fathers of Wilde, Yeats and J… ,