Paul Binding

Cabbies and Caves

The Tower of London: Tales of Victorian London

By

Peter Owen 240pp £14.95 order from our bookshop

Those who have been captivated by the Mitchell & Kenyon films of British urban life in the early twentieth century, and who feel that, through them, they have moved among their forebears for the first time ever and seen them as ordinary, independent people, will surely react similarly to the essays and vignettes collected in The Tower of London. The camera here is a Japanese teacher and scholar of English literature who, aged thirty-three and by courtesy of his own government, arrived in London in October 1900 and stayed there, quartered in various mostly dismal lodging houses, till December 1902.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • With our February issue about to go to press, enjoy a slice of LR history - Hilary Mantel on Joan Haslip's biograph… ,
    • What did London look like in the 6th Century? Rory Naismith's 'Citadel of the Saxons' tries to answer that questi… ,
    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,