Frederick Taylor

City At War

Berlin at War: Life and Death in Hitler’s Capital, 1939–45

By

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While living in Sydney during the 1980s, I found myself asking an Australian acquaintance why, in a supposedly irreverent land originally settled by convicts, the government – and especially the educational system in New South Wales, within whose confines my son was less than happy – seemed surprisingly authoritarian. Ah, he answered with a grin. Yes, of course there had been all those criminals and rebels. But, you see, there had also been the jailers. And their descendants were still here as well.

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