John Lloyd

Despondent Correspondent

War and the Death of News: Reflections of a Grade B Reporter

By

Oneworld 295pp £18.99 order from our bookshop

A work whose title links war to the ‘death of news’ must prove a malign relationship between the two, and this one doesn’t. News isn’t dead; neither war nor Donald Trump has killed it. Martin Bell’s lament is the cry of someone whose view of the news media is bounded by the BBC, where he spent much of his life working. For him, the BBC’s great years, to which he was a major contributor, are gone: like many of his colleagues, he represents the organisation today as slow-witted, deeply conservative and uncaring, and run by opportunist idiots. This is probably evidence of love rather than hate – and so it should be, because the BBC served him as well as he served it.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • 'The breadth of Clarke’s knowledge and experience, coupled to a conspicuous absence of pomposity, makes for easy an… ,
    • In this month's Silenced Voices, Lucy Popescu shines a light on Myanmar's persecution of writers and journalists, p… ,
    • Lecture on war and peace in 19th-century Europe by Professor Sir Richard Evans, Thurs 25 Oct, 6.30pm Europe House… ,
    • 'Why, throughout the world, are so many people fascinated by the fiction and reality of espionage? And why of all p… ,
    • . here on books, Muriel Spark and life's tangled dance ,
    • RT : There aren't enough aggressive subtitles these days: ,
    • Churchill's on the cover of the October edition of the magazine. Piers Brendon reviews two new books about the Brit… ,