R I Moore

Doubting Thomas

The Murder of William of Norwich: The Origins of the Blood Libel in Medieval Europe

By E M Rose

Oxford University Press 394pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

In 1149 the followers of a down-at-heel knight named Simon de Novers relieved him of a substantial debt by murdering the man to whom he owed it, Eleazer, a leading member of Norwich’s small and recently arrived community of Jews. Faced with the impossible task of defending him in the royal court, Simon’s lord, Bishop William Turbe, contrived a diversion by arguing that another charge – that some five years earlier Eleazer had led a conspiracy among the Jews to murder a twelve-year-old skinner’s apprentice, also called William – should be heard first. King Stephen prudently postponed the matter and both charges remained unresolved, but they made William of Norwich the prototype of the child ritually murdered by Jews, which became one of the ugliest fables in the repertoire of European anti-Semitism. (A different claim, that Jews drank children’s blood or used it for ritual purposes, first surfaced at Fulda in Germany in 1236.) Such tales were repeated in every subsequent century and in every part of Europe,

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