Stephen Amidon

Driven To Succeed

His Father’s Son: Earl and Tiger Woods

By

Mainstream 284pp £10.99 order from our bookshop

In the late 1990s, Tiger Woods accomplished a feat many thought impossible – he made golf look cool. Athletic, intense, charismatic and black, he seemed to reinvent a game that had previously been the domain of conservative white guys who looked more like mortgage brokers than world-class athletes. Watching Woods storm the sedate greens of Augusta, one could imagine a whole new generation taking up clubs – kids who would otherwise only have stepped onto the golf course to cut the grass.

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