David Kynaston

East End Chronicles

Call the Midwife

By

Weidenfeld & Nicolson 340pp £12.99 order from our bookshop

Family and Kinship in East London

By

Penguin Books 210pp £9.99 order from our bookshop

The publisher’s hype for Call the Midwife does Jennifer Worth few favours. ‘Appeals to the huge market for nostalgia … Jennifer is a natural-born storyteller. She’ll be perfect for publicity … Misery memoir meets a fascinating slice of social history.’ Increasingly convinced that sentimentality is the bane of writing about the recent past, I approached her book with distinct misgivings.

I could hardly have been more wrong. Worth is indeed a natural storyteller – in the best sense of the term, with apparent artlessness in fact concealing high art – and her detailed account of being a midwife in London’s East End during the early 1950s is gripping, moving and convincing from beginning to end. One knows in one’s bones whether one trusts an author, and I felt I could trust her, fortified by passing references to Austen and Trollope. Call the Midwife is apparently the first in a trilogy, and it will be fascinating to see what follows.

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