Fergus Fleming

England Made Them

Shades of Greene: One Generation of an English Family

By

Jonathan Cape 580pp £25 order from our bookshop

‘What twentieth-century books will survive thirty or forty years more?’ Graham Greene once pondered. ‘How long will anyone be read?’ In his case, at least, a quick glance at Amazon shows the Greene backlist is in good health. What’s more, the number of people still reading his books is almost equalled by those who want to read about Greene himself. In the nearly twenty years since he died (of leukaemia in 1991) there has been a steady stream of biographies, memoirs and ‘other reading’, of which the most monumental is Norman Sherry’s trilogy, begun while its subject was still alive. 

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,
    • ‘Look,’ says Trump. ‘The fact is I’m only human.’ On the evidence of this book that point is debatable. From the A… ,
    • From our December/January issue - here's John Banville's review of Colm Tóibín on the fathers of Wilde, Yeats and J… ,