Andy & Jack Martin

Father & Son

Why Grow Up?

By

Penguin 231pp £8.99 order from our bookshop

Andy writes:

There’s no way I can lose my keys now,’ my son was saying to me the other day. ‘I have a system. I haven’t lost a key for four years.’ Youthful hubris? Wild-eyed utopianism? Or was he just having a junior moment? Perhaps this shows up the intellectual differences between us: he, in his relative innocence, believes he has finally solved the eternally vexed issue of how to hold on to your keys, whereas all I have to look forward to is an afterlife in which every missing key is finally returned to me.

Of course, I feel rather like that writer who said that when he had been growing up he was supposed to respect his elders, and now that he was older he found he was supposed to respect the youth. Maybe it’s not too late to get that respect though. Susan Neiman has come up with some powerful philosophical arguments for not over-idealising youth culture. 

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • RT : Founded in 1979, is a trusted independent source for reviews of new books across a variety of genres. A… ,
    • RT : Here we are - "Shelf Indulgence" by Ed Potten, a wonderful read, well worth your time: @Lit_Review,
    • 'Like going to a party hoping to get away as quickly as politeness allowed and at 4am finding myself still engrosse… ,
    • 'Neville never shed his sense of being the junior, and perhaps least-deserving Chamberlain.' From the archive, Mic… ,
    • 'The erecting and immediate destruction of a series of straw men rather detracts from what is for the most part an… ,
    • RT : A magnificent demolition job on this "acid laced tirade...unpleasantly self-obsessed...self pitying polemic...book… ,
    • 'Seventy years on, the time we have left to gather such first-hand testimony is running out.' John Keay on the sig… ,