Tim Richardson

Happy Horticulturalists

The Brother Gardeners: Botany, Empire and the Birth of an Obsession

By

William Heinemann 356pp £18.99 order from our bookshop

Ever since Sir Nikolaus Pevsner suggested, in the Architectural Review in 1944, that the eighteenth-century landscape garden was Britain’s greatest contribution to the visual arts of the West – with the possible exception of Perpendicular Gothic architecture – the gates to the garden have been ajar to scholars from the disciplines of art and architectural history. This has been greatly to the benefit of garden history as a subject in its own right, even if most art historians have tended to confine themselves to a few key gardens, such as Stowe and Stourhead.

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