Jane Charteris

He Could Make Love to his Wife Only in the Dark

Buñuel

By John Baxter

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It always come as a surprise to recall that Luis Buñuel’s deserved fame as one of the great film-makers rests almost entirely on a handful of films he made in his sixties and seventies. Surely, by this time in an artist’s life, a body of work has been built up through which the eager young student can trawl for those recurring themes and obsessions which mark the artist’s development from spring chicken to wise old owl? Serious film students and enthusiasts will know of, even if they haven’t seen, his two Surrealist masterpieces, Un Chien Andalou and L’Age d’Or, made in his late twenties and in the infancy of cinema itself. Then, apparently, nothing for thirty-odd years until Veridiana, Belle de Jour, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and the rest enthralled a new filmgoing generation.

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