Alex Preston

Hitting the Right Note

The first time someone bent my ear on the subject of my author’s note was at the Italian launch of In Love and War in Florence. The reader was a rather strident older lady in something blousy and floral. She fixed me with narrow, sceptical eyes as we spoke. ‘Why,’ she asked, ‘was there no author’s note at the front of the book? I couldn’t tell what was true and what wasn’t. It’s confusing.’ I told her that Alan Hollinghurst’s The Stranger’s Child had been the model for my approach. I’d been impressed, I said, that in a novel so dense with historical detail, clearly so richly researched, the only words from Hollinghurst which precede the book are of thanks – for the use of Passa Porta writers’ apartment in Brussels. 

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • What a charming, candid blogpost from one of our dear contributing editors. ,
    • RT : The first guess from one of my 1st graders was “death” and such an awed, somber, reflective hush fell over the clas… ,
    • Merry Christmas from Literary Review! Hope your stockings were laden with books, and the tree bending under the weight of further books....,
    • Last minute Christmas gift required? We're offering discounts on all our subscriptions (20% no less!) with the cod… ,
    • In this issue's 'Silenced Voices', Lucy Popescu writes of Thailand's restrictive lese-majesty laws and their latest… ,
    • "Gunn was a disciple of the American formalist Yvor Winters, but Winters’s poetry could never give off such a scent… ,
    • Christmas gift hunting? Why not give the gift of being even better read? We're offering discounts on all our subscr… ,