Richard Cobb

I Remember It Well

Playing For Time

By Jeremy Lewis

Collins 240 pp £12.95 order from our bookshop

Jeremy Lewis proposes, at the outset, a programme that is both modest and promising: a slice of autobiography that is entertaining, evocative of place, and in some way representative of many other equally unimportant lives: a middle-class chronicle between the late-1940s and mid- 1950s. When writing about himself, he is always engagingly self-deprecatory, without ever being in the least bit arch, a difficult balance that is achieved with a touch that is constantly light. He is funny on the subject of himself because he finds himself, especially as a schoolboy, or as a large, hefty, clumsy nineteen year-old, genuinely funny, and he convinces the reader

Donmar Warehouse


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