Patrick O’Connor

Patrick O’Connor Meets Edgardo Cozarinsky

In her introduction to Edgardo Cozarinsky’s collection of stories, Urban Voodoo (first published in Buenos Aires in 1985), Susan Sontag defined him as a filmmaker turned writer. She wrote that his tales, with their unforgettable visual descriptions, belonged to a tradition of ‘rueful, semi-hallucinatory depictions of … the strangeness of modern city life’. In the new century, Cozarinsky has established himself as one of the most individual voices to emerge from modern Argentina. If some people see him as a disciple of Borges (his early books include Borges In and On Film), Cozarinsky cites Henry James as the first and most important influence on his work. His novels and stories, while they have a brevity unknown to James, are full of hidden, half-told histories, subtle references to names, tunes, places that may mean little at first but which are imbued with the melancholy of tango, the hopelessness of exile and the allure of the exotic; exciting when seen from the distance of time, tawdry and deceptive up close. 

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,
    • ‘Look,’ says Trump. ‘The fact is I’m only human.’ On the evidence of this book that point is debatable. From the A… ,
    • From our December/January issue - here's John Banville's review of Colm Tóibín on the fathers of Wilde, Yeats and J… ,