Charles Shaar Murray

Rebel Rebel

33 Revolutions per Minute: A History of Protest Songs

By

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In 1972, National Lampoon released a satirical album called Radio Dinner. In one skit, Bob Dylan (viciously impersonated by Christopher Guest, later of Spinal Tap fame) voiced a commercial for a nostalgic compilation entitled Golden Protest. After singing, ‘The spangled dwarf in his bowtie/The infantry that don’t ask why’ (itself a fairly nifty parody of Dylan’s early lyric style), Guest’s dummy Dylan husks, ‘Remember those fabulous Sixties? The marches, the be-ins, the draft-card burnings … and, best of all, the music. Well, now Apple House has collected the finest of those songs on one album.’

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