Charles Shaar Murray

Rebel Rebel

33 Revolutions per Minute: A History of Protest Songs

By

Faber & Faber 843pp £17.99 order from our bookshop

In 1972, National Lampoon released a satirical album called Radio Dinner. In one skit, Bob Dylan (viciously impersonated by Christopher Guest, later of Spinal Tap fame) voiced a commercial for a nostalgic compilation entitled Golden Protest. After singing, ‘The spangled dwarf in his bowtie/The infantry that don’t ask why’ (itself a fairly nifty parody of Dylan’s early lyric style), Guest’s dummy Dylan husks, ‘Remember those fabulous Sixties? The marches, the be-ins, the draft-card burnings … and, best of all, the music. Well, now Apple House has collected the finest of those songs on one album.’

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • 'Full of invention which, at its most pedestrian, is eminently Victorian, and at its most unrestrained wildly imagi… ,
    • 'What in other hands could have been a dry, pedantic account of Christianity’s birth and evolution becomes in Holla… ,
    • RT : One of my favourite literary magazines is celebrating 40 years this year. Here is the September edition of… ,
    • 'Now that the Thames is too fast-flowing to freeze, its spirit’s devotees ... have found other climes for their pri… ,
    • 'Bythell glowers past his till at a world in slow free fall.' on the travails of a second-hand book… ,
    • 'It is a scent of animal wrath, of instinctive need, of brutal life which affects the cultured nostrils of our civi… ,
    • 'The day produced countless stories of chance, of people taking one route or another without realising that the dec… ,