Raymond Seitz

Riding Into The Sky

The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull and the Battle of the Little Big Horn

By

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The parallels are uncanny. Though continents apart, only two and a half years separated George Armstrong Custer’s calamity at the Little Big Horn in June 1876 and Lord Chelmsford’s disaster at Isandhlwana in January 1879. The terrains were similar: vast, rolling grasslands crisscrossed by deep, interlacing ravines, which easily deceived the eye and concealed the enemy. Both leaders committed the military sin of dividing their forces in hostile territory without knowing the disposition or size of their opponents. Both were lackadaisical about what little intelligence they received.

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