Tim Heald

Wild Life

Life on Air: Memoirs of a Broadcaster

By David Attenborough

BBC 384pp £18.99 order from our bookshop

David Attenborough is named after a Nottinghamshire village and has passed his name on to a fossil. The fossil is actually a bit dodgy. It came originally from the cliffs near Lyme Regis and was given to Bristol Museum by a nineteenth-century Vicar of Axminster, the Reverend William Conybeare. Attenborough tells us that it was ‘the only known specimen’ of a species with ‘the elongated neck typical of plesiosaurs but a long massive snout with huge teeth’. Unfortunately it was destroyed during the Blitz but a cast had been made by the Natural History Museum in London and it is this which has now been christened ‘Attenborosaurus conybeari’.

Subscribe to read the full article

Donmar Warehouse

kentstate_oct_2016_online

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • A mad earl, a rapacious lawyer, Lord Byron and some bizarre things in bed: Miranda Seymour on a Georgian scandal ,
    • Gideon Rachman charts the migration of power from West to East. How, asks Michael Burleigh, will the USA respond? ,
    • ‘Not everyone knows what it is to have your father’s rival’s penis inches from your nose’. Ian McEwan in a Nutshell ,
    • RT : I've got approx. 100 copies of from early 1990s-2000s to give away (most w/ covers).… ,
    • 'I Contain Multitudes is popular science writing at its best.' Wendy Moore is fascinated by a study on microbes ,
    • 'Costume of the life force? Words fail.' Germaine Greer on an ode to the condom ,
    • It's Write on Kew for the next four days. There are free copies of Literary Review about; why not dip your toe into the magazine?,