John Dugdale

A Devil on the Highway

No Country for Old Men

By

Picador 309pp 16.99 order from our bookshop

The Border Trilogy of the 1990s turned Cormac McCarthy from an obscure, reclusive author into a fêted, movie-adapted but still reclusive bestselling writer. Set in the 1940s and 1950s (although it’s forgivable to assume that All the Pretty Horses, the first and best-known novel, takes place much earlier), they essentially portray the last cowboys. In the bleak, elegiac No Country for Old Men, set in a more or less contemporary Texas, he turns his attention to another central figure of the Western, making his hero and mouthpiece one of the last old-style sheriffs.

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