George Szirtes

Binding Wit

Powers of Thirteen


Secker & Warburg 103pp £5.95 order from our bookshop

The Candy-Floss Tree


Oxford University Press 48pp £4.50 order from our bookshop

When a man writes 169 poems, of thirteen lines each, with thirteen syllables to each line; when he spends precisely thirteen poems explaining the significance of the number thirteen; when one poem is an acrostic based on his own name which contains thirteen letters; and when the last letter of each line of that acrostic adds up to another acrostic, you get the feeling that he is either very superstitious or very clever.

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