Stephen Bates

Cross Talk

That Was the Church, That Was: How the Church of England

By

Bloomsbury 255pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

Sometime in the late 1960s, Michael Ramsey, the Archbishop of Canterbury, an eccentric but saintly figure, was asked by journalists over lunch whether he thought the Church of England would survive into the next century. Doubtless beetling his copious eyebrows, he replied, ‘Well, you know, that is not certain, not certain, not certain at all. Not certain. It might easily, easily, it might easily, quite easily, just fall away after twenty years or so. Just fall away.’

Fifty years on and here we are. It is still there but the Church of England has never seemed more battered. Riven by poisonous and prolonged internal feuds over the positions first of women in its pulpits and then of gays in its presbyteries, it has appeared increasingly irrelevant to the wider society it is meant to serve as the nation’s established church. While supposedly open to all, it has almost gone out of its way to seem unwelcoming to many. 

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