John Bayley

Fools and Wise in Russia

Institute of Fools

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Gollancz 224pp £7.95 order from our bookshop

Solzhenitsyn and Dostoevsky: A Study in the Polyphonic Novel

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George Prior 217pp £10 order from our bookshop

Stories, Volume IV: 1888–1889

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Oxford University Press 287pp £14 order from our bookshop

Why did the calf butt the oak? No doubt, for a few very special calves, it is in their nature, and thank goodness for the rest of us in the herd that it should be so. Solzhenitsyn is not only a very great writer, but a man whose stand against the regime is unique in the history of great writers anywhere, particularly in Russia. Solzhenitsyn has always been very attached to Russian proverbs, and in The Oak and the Calf gives us a good many of them, such as ‘If trouble comes make use of it too’. That he has certainly done. And kept an account of the trouble in the minutest detail. As a record it is of the highest importance, but for the common reader the perusal is often fatiguing. The reason is partly the provenance of the book, which was written from day to day, under the table, in the years before Solzhenitsyn’s exile from Russia, with the KGB breathing down his neck and with no safe place for papers.

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