John Bayley

Reader, I Felt it …

Forms of Feeling in Victorian Literature

By

Peter Owen 216pp £12.50 order from our bookshop

Feeling is hardly mentioned by theorists who write about the novel today. Like excretion and sex in former days it is not a subject for discussion; it does not fit into patterns of deconstruction and linguistic analysis. In her recent exhaustive and scholarly examination of Keats’ Odes Professor Helen Vendler relegated to a note at the back the question of feeling – Keats’ and our own – putting it in an unexpectedly quaint proposition: ‘Can we weep for the heroine while admiring the zoom-shot?’

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • A piece of Literary Review history from way back in 1983: John Haffenden talks to the great Iris Murdoch. ,
    • Britain’s only travelling lit fest, the Garden Museum Literary Festival is heading to Houghton Hall, Norfolk, for a… ,
    • 'The 19th-century German sage is not my idea of a pleasant travel companion' goes hiking with Friedr… ,
    • If you want ideas about what to read next, sign up to our free email newsletter, and get book reviews, archive mate… ,
    • 'The heroic male nude could not, I think, be used today to signify civic pride and glory', as Michelangelo’s 'David… ,
    • 'Munch’s later works show us a man liberated from the torments that gave rise to some of the best-known early works… ,
    • 'We read from left to right and from start to finish. Or do we?' Stuart Hannabus considers the merits of reading i… ,