John Bayley

Reader, I Felt it …

Forms of Feeling in Victorian Literature

By

Peter Owen 216pp £12.50 order from our bookshop

Feeling is hardly mentioned by theorists who write about the novel today. Like excretion and sex in former days it is not a subject for discussion; it does not fit into patterns of deconstruction and linguistic analysis. In her recent exhaustive and scholarly examination of Keats’ Odes Professor Helen Vendler relegated to a note at the back the question of feeling – Keats’ and our own – putting it in an unexpectedly quaint proposition: ‘Can we weep for the heroine while admiring the zoom-shot?’

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