Claire Harman

How They Roared

Mr Foote’s Other Leg: Comedy, Tragedy and Murder in Georgian London

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‘Few things are as fleeting as a joker’s reputation,’ wrote an early biographer of Samuel Foote, Georgian London’s most successful and edgy comedian. Hardly anyone has heard of Foote today, and his star was falling even at the time of his death in 1777, his name in ruins after two shocking sex scandals. The funeral took place at night and was sparsely attended. Foote had been too brilliant a satirist and impersonator to inspire much trust, perhaps, and too fond of intrigue, bad company and litigation to endear himself to anyone for long.

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