Malcolm Bradbury

It Really is a Very Important Centenary

True at First Light

By

Heinemann 320pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

In the ebb and flow of modern literary reputations, Ernest Hemingway’s is one that, over recent years, has markedly ebbed. This is no doubt partly because of the machismo of his narratives and literary character, which has taken many hard knocks in our politically corrective, gender-rebalancing age. But there was always more to it than that. As Cyril Connolly put it in the fine obituary he wrote in The Sunday Times on Hemingway’s death in 1961, his work, especially the later work, was flawed by a warp in his character, ‘a sadistic facetiousness which went with a tendency to sentimentality’ and which encouraged ponderous humour, anti-intellectualism, and a bloated exploitation of his literary success.

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • From the Archive: Martyn Bedford on Ian McEwan's 'Atonement' ,
    • In 'Silenced Voices' reports the ongoing story of the human rights lawyer, Nasrin Sotoudeh, who has been… ,
    • The mystery of Jack the Ripper's identity has long been agonised over. But what do we know about his victims?… ,
    • A piece of Literary Review history from way back in 1983: John Haffenden talks to the great Iris Murdoch. ,
    • Britain’s only travelling lit fest, the Garden Museum Literary Festival is heading to Houghton Hall, Norfolk, for a… ,
    • 'The 19th-century German sage is not my idea of a pleasant travel companion' goes hiking with Friedr… ,
    • If you want ideas about what to read next, sign up to our free email newsletter, and get book reviews, archive mate… ,