Liam Hess

Jungle Fever

Infinite Ground

By Martin MacInnes

Atlantic Books 258pp £12.99 order from our bookshop

A missing-person case leads a nameless inspector into a shady underworld of corrupt corporations, random disappearances and duplicitous men in suits. So far, so noir. But as the narrator-inspector of Martin MacInnes’s genre-bending debut starts to disintegrate, both physically and psychologically, the book takes a sweeping diversion into the inspector’s own identification with the missing individual – a man who seems to have existed only as a cipher within an amorphous corporate enterprise that has no name, no central office and no traceable records. All of which makes Infinite Ground both peculiar and genuinely creepy, as it confidently fuses the sterile horror of the corporate world with the sensuous menace of the South American rainforest. 

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