David Collard

Keeping Calm & Carrying On

Darkness Falls from the Air


Weidenfeld & Nicolson 204pp £8.99 order from our bookshop

From 7 September 1940, London was bombed by the Luftwaffe for fifty-seven consecutive nights. More than forty thousand civilians were killed and a million homes damaged or destroyed. Other British cities – especially those with ports – were also subject to air raids, but London bore the brunt of the German onslaught. The best Blitz fiction is arguably Graham Greene’s The Ministry of Fear, published in 1943, but Nigel Balchin (1908–70) got there first a year earlier with an outstanding novel, now reissued by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. In his first-rate biography of Balchin, His Own Executioner, Derek Collett gently reminds us that the name was pronounced ‘Bol-chin’ – evidence that this once hugely popular writer, one of the best novelists of his generation, is in danger of being forgotten. 

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