Jane Ridley

Passage from India

Sophia: Princess, Suffragette, Revolutionary

By

Bloomsbury 416pp £20 order from our bookshop

Princess Sophia Duleep Singh was the youngest daughter of Duleep Singh, the deposed maharajah of the Punjab. Anita Anand has chosen to write this book as Sophia’s biography, but the rich material that she has researched is really the story of her father and his family during a century of dispossession.

Duleep was the youngest son of the warlord Ranjit Singh, the ‘Lion of the Punjab’. Ranjit conquered the Punjab from the Moguls, who had ruled there since the 16th century, and established a Sikh kingdom. On his death in 1839 the Punjab dissolved into bloody civil war, and in 1843 his only surviving son, the five-year-old Duleep (four other heirs had been murdered), became maharajah, with his tough mother acting as regent (she was the daughter of Ranjit’s kennel man; love of dogs was a persistent family trait). This unstable regime was a fruit ripe for picking by the expansionist East India Company, and in 1849 the ten-year-old Duleep was deposed and forced out. 

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Jane Ridley writes on Who’s In, Who’s Out: The Journals of Kenneth Rose, edited by D R Thorpe ,
    • 'Lucian Freud was never short of confidence. In the 1990s he painted a small head of an especially rich individual… ,
    • Robin Simon's review of Lucian Freud, edited by Martin Gayford and David Dawson ,
    • 'Lenin regularly communicated with his agents in Russia by postcard and Stalin sent girlfriends cards depicting ero… ,
    • RT : Could any book publishing people share with me their route into publishing roles for a sixth former I am working wi… ,
    • Donald Rayfield reviews Greetings From the Barricades: Revolutionary Postcards in Imperial Russia by Tobie Maythew ,
    • 'Citadel of the Saxons manages to turn the slim pickings of the surviving evidence into something like a consistent… ,