Christopher Andrew

From Russia with Lev

Stalin’s Agent: The Life & Death of Alexander Orlov

By

Oxford University Press 794pp £30 order from our bookshop

In 1937–8, at the height of the Great Terror, Nikolai Yezhov, head of the NKVD, visited Joseph Stalin in the Kremlin no fewer than 278 times for private meetings lasting a total of 834 hours. So far as is known, no previous world leader had ever spent so much time closeted with his intelligence chief.

Working for Soviet intelligence during the Terror was a high-risk occupation. Many of those who led the paranoid hunt for ‘enemies of the people’ at home and abroad themselves fell victim to the paranoia. In 1939 Yezhov was found guilty of the phenomenal feat of spying simultaneously for the secret services of Britain, Germany and Poland. 

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