Clare Clark

Quaker Notes

The Last Runaway

By

HarperCollins 343pp £14.99 order from our bookshop

In the mid-19th century Ohio was a frontier state, a barely there straggle of settlements on the way to somewhere else, a staging post for pioneers pushing westwards and runaway slaves from the South fleeing north to Canada and freedom. Though Ohio itself was free, slave hunters haunted its trails and towns, tracking down runaways for a bounty. Their authority was strengthened in 1850 by the Fugitive Slave Law, which made it a criminal offence to give food or shelter to runaways, punishable by heavy fines and even imprisonment. Abolitionists dubbed it the ‘Bloodhound Law’ for the dogs that hunted down the fugitives. And still the slaves came, seeking refuge in the state’s network of some seven hundred safe houses, known locally as the Underground Railroad. 

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