Mick Brown

Sky Ladder

To A Mountain in Tibet

By

Chatto and Windus 227pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

Before setting out on his journey to Mount Kailas in Tibet, the most sacred of the world’s mountains, holy to one-fifth of the earth’s people, Colin Thubron meets a monk named Tashi in Kathmandu who instructs him to dedicate his pilgrimage ‘to those who have died’ so that ‘they will accrue merit’.

‘They will?’ Thubron asks doubtfully. ‘Can you help the dead?’ His residual Anglicanism, he notes, offers no intercession or opportunity of consolation for those who have passed. ‘The dead were beyond reach or comfort.’

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • With our February issue about to go to press, enjoy a slice of LR history - Hilary Mantel on Joan Haslip's biograph… ,
    • What did London look like in the 6th Century? Rory Naismith's 'Citadel of the Saxons' tries to answer that questi… ,
    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,