Frances Wilson

Whose Life Is It Anyway?

Imagine the scene. Go on, project yourself into that marquee at the Brisbane Writers Festival this September when Lionel Shriver stood up at the pulpit to give the keynote speech, entitled ‘Fiction and Identity Politics’. She had been asked to speak on the subject of ‘community and belonging’, but, as she put it, expecting a ‘renowned iconoclast’ such as herself to tackle anything so mushy was like asking a ‘great white shark to balance a beach ball on its nose’.

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