Diana Athill

A Dream Betrayed

Where I Was From

By

Flamingo 226pp £14.99 order from our bookshop

IT IS GOING to be hard to give the flavour of this book in a short review, because it needs to be quoted from, and once I started quoting I would never be able to stop; it is so solidly packed with information. There is a book’s worth of it in the fourteen pages of the first chapter alone. Starting with Joan Didion’s great-great-great-great-great-grandmother (born 1766), it gives the essential stories, told in vivid ‘snapshots’, of her ancestresses, women who crossed the plains and mountains with their husbands, often at a frightful cost, until the last of them came to the promised land and joined the other creators of California. Not surprisingly, the descendants of such people take pride in their lineage, as Didion was brought up to do. And – also not surprisingly – they romanticise it. Where I Was From shows why she eventually became unable to do that.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • With our February issue about to go to press, enjoy a slice of LR history - Hilary Mantel on Joan Haslip's biograph… ,
    • What did London look like in the 6th Century? Rory Naismith's 'Citadel of the Saxons' tries to answer that questi… ,
    • Start your week with a dose of Russian Revolutionary zeal. Donald Rayfield reviews Tobie Mathew's 'Greetings From t… ,
    • A treat from the LR Archive: exactly 20 years ago, Malcolm Bradbury reviewed John Updike's 'Bech at Bay' ,
    • ‘When bullets come close, the noise they make as they go past changes from a zing to a crack’ John Lanchester's dy… ,
    • Man with a Bloody Paintbrush: Robin Simon on Lucian Freud ,
    • Jane Ridley reviews The Diaries of Kenneth Rose (ed. D R Thorpe) ,