Robert Nye

Infinite Riches in a Little Room

The World of Christopher Marlowe

By

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ON 30 MAY 1593, at ten o’clock in the morning, the poet Christopher Marlowe was at Deptford, drinking in the ‘house of a certain Eleanor Bull, widow’. He had three companions, all of them intimately connected with Thomas Walsingham, cousin of the head of Queen Elizabeth 1’s espionage service. The men spent the day drinking and talking, and walking in the garden on the bank of the Thames. When the time came to settle the bill with Widow Bull, some kind of tavern brawl seems to have developed. At the end of it, Marlowe lay dead in a pool of his own blood, stabbed through the right eye by the lowest of his three companions, one Ingram Frizer.

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