Christopher Ross

Martial Artistry

Kendo: Culture of the Sword

By

University of California Press 286pp £22.95 order from our bookshop

I was going to start this review with a joke about the ‘Last Samurai’ Saigō Takamori’s testicles, which were huge, but as it would take more than four hundred words to tell, I shall refrain. Instead, to have any chance of describing Alexander Bennett’s close investigation into the culture of the Japanese sword and those who wielded it, embedded in a lucid, scholarly ramble through centuries of Japanese history, we must use those words to contextualise. Samurai were hereditary clans specialising in the arts of war. In the late Heian Period (794–1185), the emperor and his kuge (nobles) were challenged by powerful samurai alliances and eventually ceded power to Minamoto Yoritomo, who established a samurai government in Kamakura in 1192. The emperor formally appointed Yoritomo as sei-i taishōgun, or generalissimo. This domination by the samurai of central governance (with the emperor in Kyoto retained as de jure ruler), with the concomitant political struggle between samurai houses, was to last until the Meiji Restoration of 1868. 

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • A piece of Literary Review history from way back in 1983: John Haffenden talks to the great Iris Murdoch. ,
    • Britain’s only travelling lit fest, the Garden Museum Literary Festival is heading to Houghton Hall, Norfolk, for a… ,
    • 'The 19th-century German sage is not my idea of a pleasant travel companion' goes hiking with Friedr… ,
    • If you want ideas about what to read next, sign up to our free email newsletter, and get book reviews, archive mate… ,
    • 'The heroic male nude could not, I think, be used today to signify civic pride and glory', as Michelangelo’s 'David… ,
    • 'Munch’s later works show us a man liberated from the torments that gave rise to some of the best-known early works… ,
    • 'We read from left to right and from start to finish. Or do we?' Stuart Hannabus considers the merits of reading i… ,