Richard Cockett

Selfish Capital

A Line in the River: Khartoum, City of Memory

By

Bloomsbury 416pp £21.99 order from our bookshop

In truth, Khartoum has never been much to write home about. It has none of the history, architecture or charm of Cairo, Cape Town or Dakar, to name just a few cities in Africa, let alone anywhere else, to compensate for its drabness, poverty and parochialism. Given its majestic location, at the confluence of the White and Blue Niles, Khartoum really should have done better, especially when it was the capital of the largest country in Africa, a status it held until South Sudan broke off in 2011.

Sign Up to our newsletter

Receive free articles, highlights from the archive, news, details of prizes, and much more.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Same trouble, different decade. Turns out this is not the first time has graced our humble cover.… ,
    • 'Gresham played an essential part in ensuring the stability of Tudor rule, in ways not always recognised in textboo… ,
    • Iris Murdoch was born one hundred years ago today. Thirty-six years ago, we published this interview with her ,
    • 'The official narrative has been that since the end of coal-burning in homes in the 1950s and the demise of heavy i… ,
    • 'Porter’s is a cacophonous vision that continually recalls the playwright Tony Kushner’s characterisation of Americ… ,
    • Lucy Moore makes her way through the Italian city of Otranto, discussing the origins of the Gothic and the legacy o… ,
    • .@NJCooper_crime's July crime roundup includes 'horrifying' and 'imaginative' new novels by @sarah_hilary,… ,