Richard Cockett

War without End

Breaking Sudan: The Search for Peace

By

Oneworld 370pp £25 order from our bookshop

South Sudan has two claims to distinction. It is the world’s newest country and it has pretty much cornered the market in dismal statistics. The possible connection between these two facts is the subject of Jok Madut Jok’s book Breaking Sudan. 

Consider the bleak roll call. At the time it gained independence in 2011, this east African state of about eight million people had a literacy rate of less than 27 per cent and the worst childhood immunisation rate in Africa. A fourteen-year-old girl was more likely to die in childbirth than graduate from high school, almost half the population suffered from malnutrition and millions were living as refugees in various countries around the region. There was, though, something of an excuse for this litany of misery: over fifty years of on-off civil war between the mainly Christian south Sudanese and successive government regimes in Khartoum in the largely Muslim north of Sudan.


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