Adam LeBor

The Dark Side

Madness Visible: A Memoir of War

By

Bloomsbury 286pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

The grim scene at the refugee centre in the Ottoman town of Travnik was mirrored all over Bosnia that winter of 1993. Behind the thick ochre walls of the schoolhouse dozens of cold, hungry and traumatised Bosnian Muslims eked out a meagre existence on UN handouts, trying their hardest to preserve their dignity and the vestiges of family life. It was so cold that the lines of laundry strung between the walls outside had frozen solid.

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