David Wheatley

He Was Afraid of Cows

The Letters of T S Eliot, Volume 7: 1934–1935

By

Faber & Faber 948pp £50 order from our bookshop

If the letters of T S Eliot were a television box set, the most recent few volumes would have elicited their share of mutterings from critics about ‘jumping the shark’. Tom, the nervous young American lead, has long since settled into his plush job in London publishing, the drama of his marriage breakdown has been drawn out unconscionably, and his dusty Anglican phase makes a poor substitute for stays in a Swiss sanatorium or spending the night alone on a deckchair in Eastbourne during his honeymoon. Oh, and the poetry seems to have dried up too, before the surprise appearance of ‘Burnt Norton’ in the period covered by The Letters of T S Eliot, Volume 7. The letters have their moments, but the effort of skimming almost a thousand pages for the highlights may deter all but the most devoted of Eliotians.

Follow Literary Review on Twitter

  • Last Tweets

    • Whom did Picasso label a 'bristly pig'? Read Rosalind P Blakesley's review of The Collector by Natalya Semenova to… ,
    • Alexandra Gajda on Anna Beer's new biography, Patriot or Traitor: The Life and Death of Sir Walter Ralegh ,
    • Mark Lawson reviews @jonathancoe's Middle England - The Rotters' Club for our Brexit age. ,
    • 'Behind every book that is published lies ... a haunted landscape, populated by the ghosts of things written and ex… ,
    • 'We once more live in a great age of dragon invention' Here's Tom Shippey on Martin Arnold's The Dragon ,
    • RT : Man at the q&a part of the book panel: Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't say it Don't s… ,
    • Here's @epkaufm's Whiteshift, reviewed in this month's magazine by ,