Frances Wilson

What’s Cooking?

The Culinary Imagination: From Myth to Modernity

By

W W Norton 404pp £20 order from our bookshop

Thirty-five years ago, Sandra M Gilbert and Susan Gubar coauthored a book with the wonderful title The Madwoman in the Attic. Their argument, briefly, was that Victorian fiction allowed for two kinds of women, either angels or monsters. Teeming with fresh ideas, The Madwoman in the Attic was one of those books that becomes a foundation stone of English literature syllabuses everywhere; when I was an undergraduate, Gilbert and Gubar, as they were known, were as famous as Gilbert and Sullivan. 

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