Kevin Jackson

Civilising Influence

Kenneth Clark: Life, Art and 'Civilisation'

By James Stourton

William Collins 478pp £30 order from our bookshop

Lord Clark did not want for detractors. Plenty of people found him chilly, arrogant, complacent and self-deceived. Some of his fellow art historians thought him unscholarly and superficial (and others thought him first-rate). In later life he was a chronic adulterer and he could be a rude, difficult colleague. Even his most famous achievement, the television series Civilisation, infuriated many viewers with its robustly traditional faith in the transcendental value of art and the mystery of genius – or simply with its unembarrassed poshness. And so on.

Donmar Warehouse


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