Kevin Jackson


The Book of Magic: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment

By Brian Copenhaver (ed) Translated by Brian Copenhaver

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Brian Copenhaver’s hefty anthology of some three-thousand-odd years of writing on magic is wide-ranging, bracingly independent-minded and deliciously erudite. The book is arranged in chronological order and divided into eleven sections, and it gathers together the better part of two hundred short texts – many of them freshly translated by Copenhaver, a professor of philosophy at UCLA – starting with the Old Testament. He moves on to ancient Greece and Rome, and then, via the Middle Ages and the early modern period, to the first stirrings of the Enlightenment in the later 17th century with the likes of Newton’s furious rival and enemy, Leibniz. 

Donmar Warehouse


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